Charting the Federal Reserve’s Liabilities – 1915 to 2012

Several months ago we brought you a history of the Federal Reserve’s assets in charts — here we complete the story by presenting the evolution of its liabilities from 1915 to 2012.

 

As mentioned when we examined the assets side of the Fed’s balance sheet:

…the Fed has degenerated from a by and large passive institution (dealing only in high-quality self-liquidating commercial paper and gold) to an active pursuant of junk, an enabler of wars, a ‘benevolent’ combatant of the depressions of its own creation, a central planner of employment & prices and of course a forgiving friend to inconvenient market follies.

 

Update: You can now buy the data behind these charts.

 

The Fed’s Liabilities from 1915 to 2012 – Hover & Click to Zoom Into Each Time Period…

 

 

1915 to 1925

 

The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1915 to 1925

Click to enlarge. The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1915 to 1925. Source: St Louis Fed, FRASER

 

Back to the original chart.

 

1925 to 1935

 

The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1925 to 1935

Click to enlarge. The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1925 to 1935. Source: St Louis Fed, FRASER

 

Back to the original chart.

 

1935 to 1945

 

The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1935 to 1945

Click to enlarge. - The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1935 to 1945. Source: St Louis Fed, FRASER

 

Back to the original chart.

 

1945 to 1955

 

The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1945 to 1955

Click to enlarge. - The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1945 to 1955

 

Back to the original chart.

 

1955 to 1965

 

The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1955 to 1965

Click to enlarge. The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1955 to 1965. Source: St Louis Fed, FRASER

 

Back to the original chart.

 

1965 to 1975

 

The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1965 to 1975

Click to enlarge. - The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1965 to 1975. Source: St Louis Fed, FRASER

 

Back to the original chart.

 

1975 to 1985

 

The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1975 to 1985

Click to enlarge. - The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1975 to 1985. Source: St Louis Fed, FRASER

 

Back to the original chart.

 

1985 to 1995

 

The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1985 to 1995

Click to enlarge. - The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1985 to 1995. Source: St Louis Fed, FRASER

 

Back to the original chart.

 

1995 to 2005

 

The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1995 to 2005

Click to enlarge. - The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 1995 to 2005. Source: St Louis Fed, FRASER

 

Back to the original chart.

 

2005 to 2012

 

The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 2005 to 2012

Click to enlarge. - The Federal Reserve's Liabilities from 2005 to 2012. Source: St Louis Fed, FRASER

 

Back to the original chart.

 

See here for our collection of rare historical economic data.

Posted Jun 12, 2012
  • therooster

    Gresham’s Law is beginning to reverse as the consciousness of why gold-as-money has been typically hoarded throughout history. The problem was not the bullion. The problem was poor liquidity, logistically, due to an absence of a real-time valuation method/process. Gold was set free in 1971 and now has the ability to be re-monetized in real-time, by the marketplace. I doubt this will be a top-down process. The shift would be too abrupt in the transition. The shift should be organic and this is why the elite cannot and will not endorse bullion as money. It’s simply not their role in “the script”. They now simply “carry the stick.” INFLATION !

    The free floating USD’s ultimate role is not that of a currency. It’s been a currency as a stop-gap measure since 1971 but its ultimate purpose was/is/will be as a real-time measure for real-time bullion based currency. The severing of the dollar-gold FIXED peg was essential to this outcome. You cannot pour new wine into old wineskins.

  • therooster

    Gresham’s Law is beginning to reverse as the consciousness of why gold-as-money has been typically hoarded throughout history seeps in. The problem was not the bullion. The problem was poor liquidity, logistically, due to an absence of a real-time valuation method/process. Gold was set free in 1971 and now has the ability to be re-monetized in real-time, by the marketplace. I doubt this will be a top-down process. The shift would be too abrupt in the transition. The shift should be organic and this is why the elite cannot and will not endorse bullion as money. It’s simply not their role in “the script”. They now simply “carry the stick.” INFLATION !

    The free floating USD’s ultimate role is not that of a currency. It’s been a currency as a stop-gap measure since 1971 but its ultimate purpose was/is/will be as a real-time measure for real-time bullion based currency. The severing of the dollar-gold FIXED peg was essential to this outcome. You cannot pour new wine into old wineskins.

  • Matslinger

    A great deal of energy is being wasted analizing the direction of the trend.
    Direction is only important if you continue to run in and out of this burning
    building with loot, hoping you can get in and out just one more time before
    it collapses on top of you.
    The winners of this game are those who lose the least. When the paper money system
    dies, the elites will lose power, and do what they’ve always done, “thrust the planet
    into world war”.
    Instead of “direction” , investors should be poised for “destination”.
    Stay out of burning buildings.

    • Greshamslawcom

      Perhaps! Thanks for the advice!

  • http://hopefulvision.blogspot.com/ Brian Cady

    I’d like to see these curves denominated not in the dollar of the day, but in gold per capita, at the then-prevailing price of gold. Interesting post, thanks.

    • Greshamslawcom

      Hi Brian,

      Thanks for the kind words.

      Could you elaborate please? That may well be worth doing — I’m just unsure about why at first glance…